A.J. Aranyosi



Position

Research Scientist in the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT.

Education

B.S. in Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 1993.
Ph.D. in Speech and Hearing Sciences, MIT, 2002.

Organizations

American Association for the Advancement of Science
Association for Research in Otolaryngology

PhD Thesis

For my PhD thesis, I worked on measuring sound-induced motions of cochlear structures in the alligator lizard cochlea. This work involved several different disciplines. Because the measurements were made using an in vitro preparation, we had to develop techniques to extract the cochlea as gently as possible and maintain it in an artificial environment for several hours. Sound-induced motions are microscopic, so we had to develop techniques to measure nanometer-scale motions at audio frequencies. Using such techniques, we measured motions of the basilar papilla, the hair bundles of hair cells, and the overlying tectorial membrane as a function of frequency in response to sound stimuli. Preliminary analyses of these measurements have been reported at meetings of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology for several years. A more detailed analysis appears in my PhD thesis, which was completed in the spring of 2002.

Publications (currently out of date)

  • A. J. Aranyosi and D. M. Freeman (2002). A Two-Mode Model of Motion of the Alligator Lizard Basilar Papilla.
    Twenty Fifth Midwinter Research Meeting of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, February 2002.
  • A. J. Aranyosi and D. M. Freeman (2001). Mechanical Properties of the Basilar Papilla of Alligator Lizard.
    Twenty Fourth Midwinter Research Meeting of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, February 2001.
  • A. J. Aranyosi and D. M. Freeman (2000). Tomographic reconstruction of three-dimensional cochlear motions.
    Twenty Third Midwinter Research Meeting of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, February 2000.
  • A. J. Aranyosi and D. M. Freeman (1999). Media dependence of blebbing in cochlear hair cells.
    Twenty Second Midwinter Research Meeting of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, February 1999.
  • A. J. Aranyosi, C. Q. Davis, and D. M. Freeman (1998). Experimental measurements of micromechanical transfer functions in the alligator lizard.
    Twenty First Midwinter Research Meeting of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, February 1998.

    Linux Info

    In my "spare time," I work on our local computer system. Here are links to a few things I've done/found that other people may find interesting:

  • General information about Linux, targeted to our network.
  • Why doesn't the EPS output of Adobe Illustrator V9.0 behave properly in LaTeX? This may be the answer.
  • A driver for a P-723 pizeoelctric nanopositioner for microscope objectives.
  • Notes on configuring Gentoo Linux on an IBM ThinkPad T42p.
  • My email address is aja at this university (not spelled out to reduce the amount of spam I get).


    Back to MIT cochlear physiology group home page.